Exploring farmer preferences for contagious bovine pleuropneumonia vaccination: a case study of Narok district of Kenya

Salome Kairu-Wanyoike, Simon Kaitibie, Nick M. Taylor, George K. Gitau, Claire Heffernan, Christian Schnier, Evans Taracha, Declan McKeever

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is an economically important disease in most of sub-Saharan Africa. A conjoint analysis and ordered probit regression models were used to measure the preferences of farmers for CBPP vaccine and vaccination attributes. This was with regard to inclusion or not of an indicator in the vaccine, vaccine safety, vaccine stability as well as frequency of vaccination, vaccine administration and the nature of vaccination. The analysis was carried out in 190 households in Narok District of Kenya between October and December 2006 using structured questionnaires, 16 attribute profiles and a five-point Likert scale. The factors affecting attribute valuation were shown through a two-way location interaction model. The study also demonstrated the relative importance (RI) of attributes and the compensation value of attribute levels. The attribute coefficient estimates showed that farmers prefer a vaccine that has an indicator, is 100% safe and is administered by the government (p0.05). While inclusion of an indicator in the vaccine was the most important attribute (RI=43.6%), price was the least important (RI=0.5%). Of the 22 household factors considered, 15 affected attribute valuation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)356-369
Number of pages14
JournalPreventive Veterinary Medicine
Volume110
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2013

Keywords

  • vaccination
  • bovine pleuropneumonia
  • Kenya
  • farmers

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