Experiences of diagnosis, stigma, culpability, and disclosure in male patients with hepatitis C virus: an interpretative phenomenological analysis

Anna Krzeczkowska, Paul Flowers, Zoe Chouliara, Peter Hayes, Adele Dickson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The current study aimed to explore the lived experience of patients with HCV infection. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven male participants living with HCV and were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Two master themes were identified: (1) Diagnosis and the search for meaning, and (2) Impact of stigma on disclosure. Participants reported fears of contaminating others, feelings of stigma and concerns of disclosing the condition to others. Response to diagnosis, stigma and disclosure amongst the participants appeared to be interrelated and directly related to locus of blame for virus contraction. More specifically, HCV transmission via medical routes led to an externalisation of culpability and an openness to disclosure. Transmission of HCV as a direct result of intravenous drug use led to internalised blame and a fear of disclosure. The inter- and intra-personal consequences of HCV explored in the current study have potential implications for tailoring future psychological therapy and psychoeducation to the specific needs of the HCV population.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages17
JournalHealth
Early online date13 May 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 13 May 2019

Fingerprint

Disclosure
Hepacivirus
contagious disease
anxiety
Fear
experience
drug use
Emotions
Interviews
Psychology
interview
Viruses
Infection
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Population
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • disclosure
  • hepatitis C virus
  • interpretative phenomenological analysis
  • stigma

Cite this

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abstract = "The current study aimed to explore the lived experience of patients with HCV infection. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven male participants living with HCV and were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Two master themes were identified: (1) Diagnosis and the search for meaning, and (2) Impact of stigma on disclosure. Participants reported fears of contaminating others, feelings of stigma and concerns of disclosing the condition to others. Response to diagnosis, stigma and disclosure amongst the participants appeared to be interrelated and directly related to locus of blame for virus contraction. More specifically, HCV transmission via medical routes led to an externalisation of culpability and an openness to disclosure. Transmission of HCV as a direct result of intravenous drug use led to internalised blame and a fear of disclosure. The inter- and intra-personal consequences of HCV explored in the current study have potential implications for tailoring future psychological therapy and psychoeducation to the specific needs of the HCV population.",
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Experiences of diagnosis, stigma, culpability, and disclosure in male patients with hepatitis C virus: an interpretative phenomenological analysis. / Krzeczkowska, Anna; Flowers, Paul; Chouliara, Zoe; Hayes, Peter; Dickson, Adele.

In: Health, 13.05.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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