Enhanced attachment of Acanthamoeba to extended-wear silicone hydrogel contact lenses: a new risk factor for infection?

Tara K. Beattie, Alan Tomlinson, Angus K. McFadyen, David V. Seal, Anthony M. Grimason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to establish if silicone hydrogel (S-H) contact lenses could be a risk factor for Acanthamoeba infection by facilitating the attachment of trophozoites to their surface and transfer to the cornea and to determine the effect Acanthamoeba culture technique, patient wear, and Pseudomonas biofilm coating have on attachment to the S-H lens. Acanthamoebal attachment to the S-H lenses was significantly greater than to the conventional hydrogel. Liquid-cultured trophozoites demonstrated a higher affinity for the lenses tested. Wear and bacterial biofilm coating had no effect on attachment to S-H lenses. The increased attachment found with the S-H lens may be an inherent characteristic of the polymer or a side effect of the surface treatment procedure to which the lenses are exposed. It is possible that S-H lenses are at greater risk of promoting Acanthamoeba infection if exposed to the organism because of the enhanced attachment characteristic of this new material.

Original languageEnglish
JournalOpthalmology
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2003

Keywords

  • Acanthamoeba
  • contact lenses
  • trophozoites
  • vision sciences

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