Emerging collaborative research platforms for the next generation of physical activity, sleep and exercise medicine guidelines: the Prospective Physical Activity, Sitting, and Sleep consortium (ProPASS)

Emmanuel Stamatakis, Annemarie Koster, Mark Hamer, Vegar Rangul, I-Min Lee, Adrian E Bauman, Andrew J Atkin, Mette Aadahl, Charles E Matthews, Paul Jarle Mork, Lisa Askie, Peter Cistulli, Malcolm Granat, Peter Palm, Patrick Joseph Crowley, Matthew Stevens, Nidhi Gupta, Anna Pulakka, Sari Stenholm, Daniel ArvidssonGita Mishra, Patrik Wennberg, Sebastien Chastin, Ulf Ekelund, Andreas Holtermann

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

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Abstract

Galileo Galilei’s quote ‘measure what is measurable, and make measurable what is not so’ has particular relevance to health behaviours, such as physical activity (PA), sitting and sleep, whose measurement during free living is notoriously difficult. To date, much of what we know about how these behaviours affect our health is based on self-report by questionnaires which have limited validity, are prone to bias and inquire about selective aspects of these behaviours. Although self-reported evidence has made great contributions to shaping public health and exercise medicine policy and guidelines until now,1 the ongoing advancements of accelerometry-based measurement and evidence synthesis methods are set to change the landscape. The aim of this editorial is to outline new directions in PA and sleep-related epidemiology that open new horizons for guideline development and improvement; and to describe a new research collaboration platform: the Prospective Physical Activity, Sitting, and Sleep consortium (ProPASS) (figure 1).Figure 1 Measurement technology used in epidemiology has made measurable what was not so until recently. Several population-based studies use accelerometers that are worn by participants for 24 hours a day for a whole week, offering unprecedented insights into the health attributes of PA, sitting and sleep. One of the most exciting aspects of accelerometers is that they show great promise for capturing nearly complete accounts of movement behaviour, including posture and activity type detection.2 However, advanced measurement methods and optimal evidence synthesis are not synonymous. Individual …
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages3
JournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicine
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 May 2019

Keywords

  • health behaviours
  • new directions in physical activity
  • collaborative research platforms
  • ProPASS

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    Stamatakis, E., Koster, A., Hamer, M., Rangul, V., Lee, I-M., Bauman, A. E., Atkin, A. J., Aadahl, M., Matthews, C. E., Mork, P. J., Askie, L., Cistulli, P., Granat, M., Palm, P., Crowley, P. J., Stevens, M., Gupta, N., Pulakka, A., Stenholm, S., ... Holtermann, A. (2019). Emerging collaborative research platforms for the next generation of physical activity, sleep and exercise medicine guidelines: the Prospective Physical Activity, Sitting, and Sleep consortium (ProPASS). British Journal of Sports Medicine. https://doi.org/10.1136/bjsports-2019-100786