Economic recession and recovery in the UK: what's gender got to do with it?

Ailsa McKay, James Campbell, Emily Thomson, Susanne Louise Ross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study argues that a feminist economics perspective is essential in order to fully understand the gender consequences of the recent recession and the ongoing economic crisis in the United Kingdom. Unemployment and redundancy rates have been used to highlight the fact that male workers suffered the greatest impact in terms of job losses in the initial phases of the recession. However, this situation appears to have reversed with an associated program of spending cuts in public sector employment and welfare that will likely be borne by women.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)108-123
Number of pages16
JournalFeminist Economics
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2013

Fingerprint

recession
job loss
gender
redundancy
economic crisis
economics
unemployment
public sector
welfare
worker
Recession
Economic recovery
Recovery
Redundancy
Public sector
Workers
Feminist economics
Unemployment
Job loss
Economic crisis

Keywords

  • economics
  • recession
  • gender

Cite this

@article{d73cfeeab65843208d0c9e73e604cf76,
title = "Economic recession and recovery in the UK: what's gender got to do with it?",
abstract = "This study argues that a feminist economics perspective is essential in order to fully understand the gender consequences of the recent recession and the ongoing economic crisis in the United Kingdom. Unemployment and redundancy rates have been used to highlight the fact that male workers suffered the greatest impact in terms of job losses in the initial phases of the recession. However, this situation appears to have reversed with an associated program of spending cuts in public sector employment and welfare that will likely be borne by women.",
keywords = "economics, recession, gender",
author = "Ailsa McKay and James Campbell and Emily Thomson and Ross, {Susanne Louise}",
note = "Special Issue of journal:Critical and Feminist Perspectives on Financial and Economic Crises",
year = "2013",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1080/13545701.2013.808762",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "108--123",
journal = "Feminist Economics",
issn = "1354-5701",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3",

}

Economic recession and recovery in the UK: what's gender got to do with it? / McKay, Ailsa; Campbell, James; Thomson, Emily; Ross, Susanne Louise.

In: Feminist Economics, Vol. 19, No. 3, 07.2013, p. 108-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Economic recession and recovery in the UK: what's gender got to do with it?

AU - McKay, Ailsa

AU - Campbell, James

AU - Thomson, Emily

AU - Ross, Susanne Louise

N1 - Special Issue of journal:Critical and Feminist Perspectives on Financial and Economic Crises

PY - 2013/7

Y1 - 2013/7

N2 - This study argues that a feminist economics perspective is essential in order to fully understand the gender consequences of the recent recession and the ongoing economic crisis in the United Kingdom. Unemployment and redundancy rates have been used to highlight the fact that male workers suffered the greatest impact in terms of job losses in the initial phases of the recession. However, this situation appears to have reversed with an associated program of spending cuts in public sector employment and welfare that will likely be borne by women.

AB - This study argues that a feminist economics perspective is essential in order to fully understand the gender consequences of the recent recession and the ongoing economic crisis in the United Kingdom. Unemployment and redundancy rates have been used to highlight the fact that male workers suffered the greatest impact in terms of job losses in the initial phases of the recession. However, this situation appears to have reversed with an associated program of spending cuts in public sector employment and welfare that will likely be borne by women.

KW - economics

KW - recession

KW - gender

U2 - 10.1080/13545701.2013.808762

DO - 10.1080/13545701.2013.808762

M3 - Article

VL - 19

SP - 108

EP - 123

JO - Feminist Economics

JF - Feminist Economics

SN - 1354-5701

IS - 3

ER -