Directions, disconnect and critique: round table discussion

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Abstract

Purpose: Reviews developments in dark tourism research over a 20 year period from its inception in 1996. Considers the reasons why people visit dark tourism sites and the different perspectives of site operators, tourists and academics.
Design/methodology/approach: Uses a round table discussion with three participants – all researchers who played a significant role in developing the early concept of dark tourism. Explores a number of questions about past, current and future research interests and developments.
Findings: Observes that dark tourism site operators and visitors tend to view the act of remembrance as a significant reason for visiting a site associated with past atrocities. This perspective is rather different from the original concept of dark tourism – viewed by many as a form of pilgrimage tourism.
Practical implications: The review reveals a gap between aspects of the literature on dark tourism and the reasons why these sites remain popular with tourists. Site operators and visitors say that motives for visiting are more commonly associated with an act of remembrance and a sense of pilgrimage than a desire to view a site associated with pain and death.
Originality/value: This viewpoint provides a 20 year perspective on research in dark tourism based on a conversation between three of the most eminent researchers in the field.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)228-239
JournalWorldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes
Volume9
Issue number2
Early online date13 Mar 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Apr 2017

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roundtable discussion
tourism
Tourism
pilgrimage
tourist
pain
conversation
death
methodology

Keywords

  • dark tourism research
  • pilgrimage tourism

Cite this

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title = "Directions, disconnect and critique: round table discussion",
abstract = "Purpose: Reviews developments in dark tourism research over a 20 year period from its inception in 1996. Considers the reasons why people visit dark tourism sites and the different perspectives of site operators, tourists and academics.Design/methodology/approach: Uses a round table discussion with three participants – all researchers who played a significant role in developing the early concept of dark tourism. Explores a number of questions about past, current and future research interests and developments.Findings: Observes that dark tourism site operators and visitors tend to view the act of remembrance as a significant reason for visiting a site associated with past atrocities. This perspective is rather different from the original concept of dark tourism – viewed by many as a form of pilgrimage tourism.Practical implications: The review reveals a gap between aspects of the literature on dark tourism and the reasons why these sites remain popular with tourists. Site operators and visitors say that motives for visiting are more commonly associated with an act of remembrance and a sense of pilgrimage than a desire to view a site associated with pain and death.Originality/value: This viewpoint provides a 20 year perspective on research in dark tourism based on a conversation between three of the most eminent researchers in the field.",
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author = "John Lennon",
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Directions, disconnect and critique: round table discussion. / Lennon, John.

In: Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, Vol. 9, No. 2, 10.04.2017, p. 228-239.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

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AB - Purpose: Reviews developments in dark tourism research over a 20 year period from its inception in 1996. Considers the reasons why people visit dark tourism sites and the different perspectives of site operators, tourists and academics.Design/methodology/approach: Uses a round table discussion with three participants – all researchers who played a significant role in developing the early concept of dark tourism. Explores a number of questions about past, current and future research interests and developments.Findings: Observes that dark tourism site operators and visitors tend to view the act of remembrance as a significant reason for visiting a site associated with past atrocities. This perspective is rather different from the original concept of dark tourism – viewed by many as a form of pilgrimage tourism.Practical implications: The review reveals a gap between aspects of the literature on dark tourism and the reasons why these sites remain popular with tourists. Site operators and visitors say that motives for visiting are more commonly associated with an act of remembrance and a sense of pilgrimage than a desire to view a site associated with pain and death.Originality/value: This viewpoint provides a 20 year perspective on research in dark tourism based on a conversation between three of the most eminent researchers in the field.

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