Development is not the same as ageing: the relevance of puberty to health of adolescents

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

Abstract

In much academic writing on matters of adolescent public health, age is treated as a proxy for developmental stage, and yet the two are very different concepts and this lack of distinction neglects important biological processes that impact the well-being of young people. Large-scale surveys of adolescents frequently describe differences in the health and risk behaviour, as well as a wide range of health measures, as related to age (Currie et al. 2008, 2012a). Between the ages of 11 and 15 years, adolescents are immersed in a complexity of changes to their physical selves, cognitive function, emotional range, impulsivity, desire for risk taking and hormonal function (Patton and Viner 2007). These changes affect their health-related behaviour, well-being, social and gender identity, social relations and ability to concentrate and learn.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)149-150
Number of pages2
JournalInternational Journal of Public Health
Volume64
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Mar 2019

Fingerprint

Puberty
Risk-Taking
Biological Phenomena
Social Identification
Impulsive Behavior
Health Behavior
Health
Proxy
Cognition
Public Health
Adolescent Health
Surveys and Questionnaires
Social Skills

Keywords

  • puberty
  • public health
  • health and risk behaviour
  • identity
  • gender differences

Cite this

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title = "Development is not the same as ageing: the relevance of puberty to health of adolescents",
abstract = "In much academic writing on matters of adolescent public health, age is treated as a proxy for developmental stage, and yet the two are very different concepts and this lack of distinction neglects important biological processes that impact the well-being of young people. Large-scale surveys of adolescents frequently describe differences in the health and risk behaviour, as well as a wide range of health measures, as related to age (Currie et al. 2008, 2012a). Between the ages of 11 and 15 years, adolescents are immersed in a complexity of changes to their physical selves, cognitive function, emotional range, impulsivity, desire for risk taking and hormonal function (Patton and Viner 2007). These changes affect their health-related behaviour, well-being, social and gender identity, social relations and ability to concentrate and learn.",
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Development is not the same as ageing: the relevance of puberty to health of adolescents. / Currie, Candace.

In: International Journal of Public Health , Vol. 64, No. 2, 21.03.2019, p. 149-150.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

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AB - In much academic writing on matters of adolescent public health, age is treated as a proxy for developmental stage, and yet the two are very different concepts and this lack of distinction neglects important biological processes that impact the well-being of young people. Large-scale surveys of adolescents frequently describe differences in the health and risk behaviour, as well as a wide range of health measures, as related to age (Currie et al. 2008, 2012a). Between the ages of 11 and 15 years, adolescents are immersed in a complexity of changes to their physical selves, cognitive function, emotional range, impulsivity, desire for risk taking and hormonal function (Patton and Viner 2007). These changes affect their health-related behaviour, well-being, social and gender identity, social relations and ability to concentrate and learn.

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KW - public health

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KW - identity

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