Considering social enterprise involvement in the commissioning of health services in Shetland

Bobby Macaulay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Social enterprises are increasingly becoming involved in the commissioning of health services as the National Health Service in Scotland seeks more efficient and effective ways to care for an ageing population in a period of austerity. This development is of particular importance in rural areas where health services are being disproportionately affected due to funding cuts and health outcomes are suffering as a result. A geographic area of interest in terms of the inclusion of social enterprise in health strategies is Shetland. As a remote island group, different solutions to the provision of health services are required due to often inaccessible, ill-equipped and expensive statutory services. A history of available funding and ample volunteers has created a strong third sector that is able and willing to provide health services and which is increasingly adopting trading practices to ensure sustainability as non-traded income becomes scarcer. This research investigated the role currently played by social enterprises in the co-governance and co-management of health services in Shetland, what factors influence that involvement and how successful the commissioning process is seen to be. The findings shed light on the current role that social enterprises play in designing, delivering and managing health services in Shetland with implications for other rural and remote communities in Scotland.
Original languageEnglish
JournalLocal Economy
Volume31
Issue number5
Early online date23 Jun 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Social enterprise
Health services
Funding
Scotland
Third sector
Sustainability
Co-management
Inclusion
National Health Service
Governance
Aging population
Health outcomes
Health
Rural areas
Volunteers
Income
Influence factors

Keywords

  • social enterprise
  • Shetland
  • health services

Cite this

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Considering social enterprise involvement in the commissioning of health services in Shetland. / Macaulay, Bobby.

In: Local Economy, Vol. 31, No. 5, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Social enterprises are increasingly becoming involved in the commissioning of health services as the National Health Service in Scotland seeks more efficient and effective ways to care for an ageing population in a period of austerity. This development is of particular importance in rural areas where health services are being disproportionately affected due to funding cuts and health outcomes are suffering as a result. A geographic area of interest in terms of the inclusion of social enterprise in health strategies is Shetland. As a remote island group, different solutions to the provision of health services are required due to often inaccessible, ill-equipped and expensive statutory services. A history of available funding and ample volunteers has created a strong third sector that is able and willing to provide health services and which is increasingly adopting trading practices to ensure sustainability as non-traded income becomes scarcer. This research investigated the role currently played by social enterprises in the co-governance and co-management of health services in Shetland, what factors influence that involvement and how successful the commissioning process is seen to be. The findings shed light on the current role that social enterprises play in designing, delivering and managing health services in Shetland with implications for other rural and remote communities in Scotland.

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