Cognitive rehabilitation for executive dysfunction in adults with stroke or other adult non-progressive acquired brain damage

Charlie Chung, Alex Pollock, Tanya Campbell, Brian R. Durward, Suzanne Hagen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Executive functions are the controlling mechanisms of the brain and include the processes of planning, initiation, organisation, inhibition, problem solving, self monitoring and error correction. They are essential for goal-oriented behaviour and responding to new and novel situations. A high number of people with acquired brain injury, including around 75% of stroke survivors, will experience executive dysfunction. Executive dysfunction reduces capacity to regain independence in activities of daily living (ADL), particularly when alternative movement strategies are necessary to compensate for limb weakness. Improving executive function may lead to increased independence with ADL. There are various cognitive rehabilitation strategies for training executive function used within clinical practice and it is necessary to determine the effectiveness of these interventions.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberCD008391
JournalCochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Fingerprint

Executive Function
Rehabilitation
Stroke
Activities of Daily Living
Brain
Ego
Brain Injuries
Extremities

Keywords

  • cognition
  • rehabilitation
  • therapy
  • stroke

Cite this

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Cognitive rehabilitation for executive dysfunction in adults with stroke or other adult non-progressive acquired brain damage. / Chung, Charlie; Pollock, Alex; Campbell, Tanya; Durward, Brian R.; Hagen, Suzanne.

In: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, No. 4, CD008391, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Cognitive rehabilitation for executive dysfunction in adults with stroke or other adult non-progressive acquired brain damage

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AU - Pollock, Alex

AU - Campbell, Tanya

AU - Durward, Brian R.

AU - Hagen, Suzanne

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

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KW - rehabilitation

KW - therapy

KW - stroke

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