Class warriors or generous men in skirts? The Tartan Army in the Scottish and other presses

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The arrival of Scottish football fans in a foreign city is excellent news for local journalists. Many – though by no means all – dress in an often-incongruous variation on Highland dress. They combine kilts, white socks, Timberland boots (affectionately known as ‘Timbies’), T-shirts and a wide variety of headgear ranging from tammies (tam o’shanters), glengarries (military-style hats with a tartan band) often with a feather, or indeed some kind of accoutrement – for example, helmets with horns – borrowed from the opposing fans. Underwear is deemed superfluous by many, and shots of fans ‘mooning’ appear regularly in foreign newspapers...

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFrom Tartan to Tartanry: Scottish Culture, History and Myth
EditorsIan Brown
Place of PublicationEdinburgh
PublisherEdinburgh University Press
Chapter13
Pages212-231
Number of pages20
ISBN (Print)978-0748664641
Publication statusPublished - 26 Oct 2010

Publication series

NameFrom Tartan to Tartanry: Scottish Culture, History and Myth

Keywords

  • tartanry
  • Scottish history
  • Scottish culture

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