Branding and bricolage: gender, consumption and transition

Rachel Russell, Melissa Tyler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The analysis presented here focuses on the relationship between femininity, transition and consumer culture. It explores the relationship between gender and consumer culture in the context of a discussion of the transition from childhood to teenage status for a group of young girls, and seeks to make a critical contribution to contemporary debates on childhood and consumer culture by reflecting on the commercial context of this transition. In doing so, the concepts of ‘bricolage’ and ‘branding’ are considered in relation to the transitional experience of gendered consumer culture. Developing a sociological reading of Winnicott’s account of transitional objects and potential spaces, and developing Cook’s analysis of children’s consumer culture as being located in aspirational and proprietary spaces, the discussion highlights particularly the significance of transitional objects, practices and spaces in its analysis of empirical material, which incorporates both verbal and visual aspects of the lived experience of gender, consumer culture and transition into its methodology.

Original languageEnglish
JournalChildhood : a journal of global child research
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2005

Fingerprint

Femininity
Reading

Keywords

  • consumer culture
  • branding
  • transition

Cite this

@article{99781f30a8f047a99373474ab758cbd3,
title = "Branding and bricolage: gender, consumption and transition",
abstract = "The analysis presented here focuses on the relationship between femininity, transition and consumer culture. It explores the relationship between gender and consumer culture in the context of a discussion of the transition from childhood to teenage status for a group of young girls, and seeks to make a critical contribution to contemporary debates on childhood and consumer culture by reflecting on the commercial context of this transition. In doing so, the concepts of ‘bricolage’ and ‘branding’ are considered in relation to the transitional experience of gendered consumer culture. Developing a sociological reading of Winnicott’s account of transitional objects and potential spaces, and developing Cook’s analysis of children’s consumer culture as being located in aspirational and proprietary spaces, the discussion highlights particularly the significance of transitional objects, practices and spaces in its analysis of empirical material, which incorporates both verbal and visual aspects of the lived experience of gender, consumer culture and transition into its methodology.",
keywords = "consumer culture, branding, transition",
author = "Rachel Russell and Melissa Tyler",
note = "<p>Originally published in: Childhood (2005), 12 (2), pp.221-237.</p>",
year = "2005",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0907568205051905",
language = "English",
journal = "Childhood : a journal of global child research",
issn = "0907-5682",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",

}

Branding and bricolage: gender, consumption and transition. / Russell, Rachel; Tyler, Melissa.

In: Childhood : a journal of global child research , 01.05.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Branding and bricolage: gender, consumption and transition

AU - Russell, Rachel

AU - Tyler, Melissa

N1 - <p>Originally published in: Childhood (2005), 12 (2), pp.221-237.</p>

PY - 2005/5/1

Y1 - 2005/5/1

N2 - The analysis presented here focuses on the relationship between femininity, transition and consumer culture. It explores the relationship between gender and consumer culture in the context of a discussion of the transition from childhood to teenage status for a group of young girls, and seeks to make a critical contribution to contemporary debates on childhood and consumer culture by reflecting on the commercial context of this transition. In doing so, the concepts of ‘bricolage’ and ‘branding’ are considered in relation to the transitional experience of gendered consumer culture. Developing a sociological reading of Winnicott’s account of transitional objects and potential spaces, and developing Cook’s analysis of children’s consumer culture as being located in aspirational and proprietary spaces, the discussion highlights particularly the significance of transitional objects, practices and spaces in its analysis of empirical material, which incorporates both verbal and visual aspects of the lived experience of gender, consumer culture and transition into its methodology.

AB - The analysis presented here focuses on the relationship between femininity, transition and consumer culture. It explores the relationship between gender and consumer culture in the context of a discussion of the transition from childhood to teenage status for a group of young girls, and seeks to make a critical contribution to contemporary debates on childhood and consumer culture by reflecting on the commercial context of this transition. In doing so, the concepts of ‘bricolage’ and ‘branding’ are considered in relation to the transitional experience of gendered consumer culture. Developing a sociological reading of Winnicott’s account of transitional objects and potential spaces, and developing Cook’s analysis of children’s consumer culture as being located in aspirational and proprietary spaces, the discussion highlights particularly the significance of transitional objects, practices and spaces in its analysis of empirical material, which incorporates both verbal and visual aspects of the lived experience of gender, consumer culture and transition into its methodology.

KW - consumer culture

KW - branding

KW - transition

U2 - 10.1177/0907568205051905

DO - 10.1177/0907568205051905

M3 - Article

JO - Childhood : a journal of global child research

JF - Childhood : a journal of global child research

SN - 0907-5682

ER -