Asylum seekers and the co-production of public services: understanding the implications for social inclusion and citizenship

Kirsty Strokosch, Stephen P. Osborne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

This paper presents an empirical study of asylum seekers in Glasgow and their capacity to co-produce the public services they use. It is divided into three parts. The first briefly examines the theory of co-production, revisiting a conceptual framework for co-production developed through the integration of the public administration and services management literatures (Osborne and Strokosch, 2013). Second, the paper examines the capacity of asylum seekers in Scotland to co-produce, considering their position as a marginalised group in society which significantly challenges many of the assertions about the nature of co-production. Finally, the paper discusses the implications of this new evidence for our understanding of the links between public services consumption and citizenship, asking two fundamental questions: can asylum seekers, as non-citizens, co-produce the public services they receive and, if so, what forms does co-production take; and what are the implications of this for social inclusion and citizenship?
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)673 - 690
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Social Policy
Volume45
Issue number4
Early online date15 Apr 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2016

Keywords

  • asylum seekers
  • public services
  • co-production
  • social inclusion
  • citizenship

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