Associations between sleep duration, sedentary time, physical activity, and health indicators among Canadian children and youth using compositional analyses

Valerie Carson, Mark S. Tremblay, Jean-Philippe Chaput, Sebastien F.M. Chastin

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between movement behaviours (sleep duration, sedentary time, physical activity) and health indicators in a representative sample of children and youth using compositional analyses. Cross-sectional findings are based on 4169 children and youth (aged 6–17 years) from cycles 1 to 3 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey. Sedentary time (SB), light-intensity physical activity (LPA), and moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) were accelerometer-derived. Sleep duration was subjectively measured. Body mass index z scores, waist circumference, blood pressure, behavioural strengths and difficulties, and aerobic fitness were measured in the full sample. Triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, C-reactive protein, and insulin were measured in a fasting subsample. The composition of movement behaviours was entered into linear regression models via an isometric log ratio transformation and was found to be associated with all health indicators (p < 0.01). Relative to other movement behaviours, time spent in SB or LPA was positively associated (p < 0.04) and time spent in MVPA or sleep was negatively associated (p < 0.02) with obesity risk markers. Similarly, LPA was positively associated (p < 0.005) and sleep was negatively associated (p < 0.03) with unfavourable behavioural strengths and difficulties scores and systolic blood pressure. Relative to other movement behaviours, time spent in SB was negatively associated (p < 0.001) and time spent in MVPA (p < 0.001) was positively associated with aerobic fitness. Likewise, MVPA was also negatively associated with several cardiometabolic risk markers (p < 0.008). Compositional data analyses provide novel insights into collective health implications of 24-h movement behaviours and can facilitate interesting avenues for future investigations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S294-S302
Number of pages7
JournalApplied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
Volume41
Issue number6 (Suppl. 3)
Early online date16 Jun 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Sleep
Exercise
Health
Blood Pressure
Light
Linear Models
Waist Circumference
Health Surveys
C-Reactive Protein
HDL Cholesterol
Fasting
Triglycerides
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Insulin

Keywords

  • sleep duration
  • physical activity
  • movement behaviours

Cite this

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title = "Associations between sleep duration, sedentary time, physical activity, and health indicators among Canadian children and youth using compositional analyses",
abstract = "The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between movement behaviours (sleep duration, sedentary time, physical activity) and health indicators in a representative sample of children and youth using compositional analyses. Cross-sectional findings are based on 4169 children and youth (aged 6–17 years) from cycles 1 to 3 of the Canadian Health Measures Survey. Sedentary time (SB), light-intensity physical activity (LPA), and moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) were accelerometer-derived. Sleep duration was subjectively measured. Body mass index z scores, waist circumference, blood pressure, behavioural strengths and difficulties, and aerobic fitness were measured in the full sample. Triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, C-reactive protein, and insulin were measured in a fasting subsample. The composition of movement behaviours was entered into linear regression models via an isometric log ratio transformation and was found to be associated with all health indicators (p < 0.01). Relative to other movement behaviours, time spent in SB or LPA was positively associated (p < 0.04) and time spent in MVPA or sleep was negatively associated (p < 0.02) with obesity risk markers. Similarly, LPA was positively associated (p < 0.005) and sleep was negatively associated (p < 0.03) with unfavourable behavioural strengths and difficulties scores and systolic blood pressure. Relative to other movement behaviours, time spent in SB was negatively associated (p < 0.001) and time spent in MVPA (p < 0.001) was positively associated with aerobic fitness. Likewise, MVPA was also negatively associated with several cardiometabolic risk markers (p < 0.008). Compositional data analyses provide novel insights into collective health implications of 24-h movement behaviours and can facilitate interesting avenues for future investigations.",
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Associations between sleep duration, sedentary time, physical activity, and health indicators among Canadian children and youth using compositional analyses. / Carson, Valerie; Tremblay, Mark S.; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Chastin, Sebastien F.M.

In: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Vol. 41, No. 6 (Suppl. 3), 2016, p. S294-S302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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SN - 1715-5312

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