Association of grip strength with anthropometric measures: height, forearm diameter, and middle finger length in young adults

Ukachukwu Okoroafor Abaraogu, Charles Ikechukwu Ezema, Uche Nelson Ofodile, Sylvester Emeka Igwe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction Grip strength is routinely utilized in wide range of clinical setting as a physiological variable that is affected by a number of factors. Aim We examined the relationships of forearm circumference, middle finger length, height, and BMI with handgrip strength measured among a group of young adults. Material and methods This is a cross-sectional design among 517 young adults. Data was collected on one occasion using a hand held dynamometer for grip strength of dominant and non-dominant hands, commercial-scale for weight; tape measure for height, self report for age and gender. Results and discussion Forearm circumference, middle finger length and height showed significant positive correlation (P <0.01) with grip strength across both the dominant and non-dominant limb. On the other hand, there was no significant correlation between BMI and grip strength for both limbs (P > 0.05). Conclusions In determining age and gender specific nomogram as well as assessing intervention outcomes for handgrip strength in young adults, anthropometrics of forearm circumference, middle finger length and height should be considered.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)153-157
Number of pages5
JournalPolish Annals of Medicine
Volume24
Issue number2
Early online date9 Mar 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2017

Keywords

  • anthropometrics
  • grip strength
  • limb dominance
  • young adults

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