Are married women more deprived than their husbands?

Sara Cantillon, Brian Nolan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Conventional methods of analysis of poverty assume resources are shared so that each individual in a household/family has the same standard of living. This article measures differences between spouses in a large sample in indicators of deprivation of the type used in recent studies of poverty at household level. The quite limited overall imbalance in measured deprivation in favour of husbands suggests that applying such indicators to individuals will not reveal a substantial reservoir of hidden poverty among wives in non-poor households, nor much greater deprivation among women than men in poor households. This points to the need to develop more sensitive indicators of deprivation designed to measure individual living standards and poverty status, which can fit within the framework of traditional poverty research using large samples. It also highlights the need for clarification of the underlying poverty concept.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)151-171
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Social Policy
Volume27
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1998

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husband
wife
poverty
deprivation
living standard
standard of living
spouse
woman
household
resource
resources
indicator

Keywords

  • deprivation
  • gender differences
  • indicators
  • poverty analysis
  • household survey

Cite this

Cantillon, Sara ; Nolan, Brian. / Are married women more deprived than their husbands?. In: Journal of Social Policy. 1998 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. 151-171.
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Are married women more deprived than their husbands? / Cantillon, Sara; Nolan, Brian.

In: Journal of Social Policy, Vol. 27, No. 2, 04.1998, p. 151-171.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Are married women more deprived than their husbands?

AU - Cantillon, Sara

AU - Nolan, Brian

PY - 1998/4

Y1 - 1998/4

N2 - Conventional methods of analysis of poverty assume resources are shared so that each individual in a household/family has the same standard of living. This article measures differences between spouses in a large sample in indicators of deprivation of the type used in recent studies of poverty at household level. The quite limited overall imbalance in measured deprivation in favour of husbands suggests that applying such indicators to individuals will not reveal a substantial reservoir of hidden poverty among wives in non-poor households, nor much greater deprivation among women than men in poor households. This points to the need to develop more sensitive indicators of deprivation designed to measure individual living standards and poverty status, which can fit within the framework of traditional poverty research using large samples. It also highlights the need for clarification of the underlying poverty concept.

AB - Conventional methods of analysis of poverty assume resources are shared so that each individual in a household/family has the same standard of living. This article measures differences between spouses in a large sample in indicators of deprivation of the type used in recent studies of poverty at household level. The quite limited overall imbalance in measured deprivation in favour of husbands suggests that applying such indicators to individuals will not reveal a substantial reservoir of hidden poverty among wives in non-poor households, nor much greater deprivation among women than men in poor households. This points to the need to develop more sensitive indicators of deprivation designed to measure individual living standards and poverty status, which can fit within the framework of traditional poverty research using large samples. It also highlights the need for clarification of the underlying poverty concept.

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KW - gender differences

KW - indicators

KW - poverty analysis

KW - household survey

M3 - Article

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SP - 151

EP - 171

JO - Journal of Social Policy

JF - Journal of Social Policy

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