An exploratory study into the strategic significance of visual merchandising: the case of vintage fashion retailing

Karinna Nobbs, Julie McColl, Linda Shearer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

decade, having crossed over from a niche market to become a mainstream trend.
The retailing and distribution of vintage fashion is fragmented between flea
markets, charity stores, specialist stores, concessions in luxury and middle market multiples and e-tailers.1 Mhango and Niehm2 identify that the highest proportion of vintage fashion is sold by specialist stores, and therefore they became the focus of the study. These are typically small, independently owned businesses, and previous research with this sector by McColl et al.3 concluded that visual merchandising (VM) was a central feature of their positioning strategy and identity. This formed the basis of the rationale for this study which aimed to explore the motives and methods of VM adoption within vintage fashion retailing.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFrom Production to Consumption: The Cultural Industry of Fashion
EditorsM. Pedroni
Place of PublicationOxford
PublisherInter-Disciplinary Press
ISBN (Print)9781848881655
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • visual merchandising
  • vintage fashion
  • retail positioning

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