An exploration of parents' preferences for foot care in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a possible role for the discrete choice experiment

Gordon Hendry, Deborah Turner, Janet Gardner-Medwin, Paula Lorgelly, James Woodburn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: An increased awareness of patients' and parents' care preferences regarding foot care is desirable from a clinical perspective as such information may be utilised to optimise care delivery. The aim of this study was to examine parents' preferences for, and valuations of foot care and foot-related outcomes in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

METHODS: A discrete choice experiment (DCE) incorporating willingness-to-pay (WTP) questions was conducted by surveying 42 parents of children with JIA who were enrolled in a randomised-controlled trial of multidisciplinary foot care at a single UK paediatric rheumatology outpatients department. Attributes explored were: levels of pain; mobility; ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL); waiting time; referral route; and footwear. The DCE was administered at trial baseline. DCE data were analysed using a multinomial-logit-regression model to estimate preferences and relative importance of attributes of foot care. A stated-preference WTP question was presented to estimate parents' monetary valuation of health and service improvements.

RESULTS: Every attribute in the DCE was statistically significant (p < 0.01) except that of cost (p = 0.118), suggesting that all attributes, except cost, have an impact on parents' preferences for foot care for their child. The magnitudes of the coefficients indicate that the strength of preference for each attribute was (in descending order): improved ability to perform ADL, reductions in foot pain, improved mobility, improved ability to wear desired footwear, multidisciplinary foot care route, and reduced waiting time. Parents' estimated mean annual WTP for a multidisciplinary foot care service was £1,119.05.

CONCLUSIONS: In terms of foot care service provision for children with JIA, parents appear to prefer improvements in health outcomes over non-health outcomes and service process attributes. Cost was relatively less important than other attributes suggesting that it does not appear to impact on parents' preferences.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Foot and Ankle Research
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Feb 2014

Keywords

  • Discrete choice experiment
  • Foot
  • Health economics
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis
  • Podiatry

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