Agreement of the activPAL3 and activPAL for characterising posture and stepping in adults and children

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Abstract

Characterisation of physical activity and sedentary behaviour under free-living conditions is becoming increasingly important in light of growing evidence for the health implications of these behaviours. The integrity of long-term follow-up and the ability to compare outcomes between studies is critically dependent on the agreement of outcomes from successive generations of monitors. This study evaluated the agreement of the activPAL and second generation activPAL3 devices. Agreement was assessed in both adults (median 27.6y IQR 22.6) (n=20) and young people (median 12.0y IQR 4.1) (n=8) during standardised and daily living (ADL) test activities. During standardised activities; sedentary duration, upright duration, stepping duration and overall number of steps were all detected within small limits of agreement (=5%). However, the activPAL characterised more steps during jogging than the activPAL3 (adults +8.36%, young people +6.80%). Also during ADL differences arose due to different posture characterisation in young people and lower step detection in the activPAL than the activPAL3 (adults -20.58%, young people -11.43%). Second-by-second posture analysis demonstrated high levels (>90%) of agreement for all activities between monitors. However, sensitivity (68.7%) and positive predictive value (78.8%) for adult stepping demonstrated disagreement between monitor interpretation of movement patterns during ADL. Agreement between monitor outcomes for standardised activities provides confidence that these outcomes can be considered almost equivalent. However, for characterisation of jogging and smaller movements during ADL it is likely that significant differences between monitor outcomes will arise.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)209-214
Number of pages6
JournalGait and Posture
Volume48
Early online date1 Jun 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2016

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Jogging
Posture
Young Adult
Social Conditions
Activities of Daily Living
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Exercise
Equipment and Supplies
Health

Keywords

  • activPAL3; activPAL; posture and stepping

Cite this

@article{2fd3da24e0dc42249b10adc8e4591757,
title = "Agreement of the activPAL3 and activPAL for characterising posture and stepping in adults and children",
abstract = "Characterisation of physical activity and sedentary behaviour under free-living conditions is becoming increasingly important in light of growing evidence for the health implications of these behaviours. The integrity of long-term follow-up and the ability to compare outcomes between studies is critically dependent on the agreement of outcomes from successive generations of monitors. This study evaluated the agreement of the activPAL and second generation activPAL3 devices. Agreement was assessed in both adults (median 27.6y IQR 22.6) (n=20) and young people (median 12.0y IQR 4.1) (n=8) during standardised and daily living (ADL) test activities. During standardised activities; sedentary duration, upright duration, stepping duration and overall number of steps were all detected within small limits of agreement (=5{\%}). However, the activPAL characterised more steps during jogging than the activPAL3 (adults +8.36{\%}, young people +6.80{\%}). Also during ADL differences arose due to different posture characterisation in young people and lower step detection in the activPAL than the activPAL3 (adults -20.58{\%}, young people -11.43{\%}). Second-by-second posture analysis demonstrated high levels (>90{\%}) of agreement for all activities between monitors. However, sensitivity (68.7{\%}) and positive predictive value (78.8{\%}) for adult stepping demonstrated disagreement between monitor interpretation of movement patterns during ADL. Agreement between monitor outcomes for standardised activities provides confidence that these outcomes can be considered almost equivalent. However, for characterisation of jogging and smaller movements during ADL it is likely that significant differences between monitor outcomes will arise.",
keywords = "activPAL3; activPAL; posture and stepping",
author = "Ceri Sellers and Philippa Dall and Margaret Grant and Ben Stansfield",
note = "Acceptance date: 23-5-16 (proof in SAN) Online pub date: 1-6-16; 12m embargo required for this journal AAM: received by email 27-6-16 Funder: EPSRC (Elsevier has agreement with funders and 12m embargo is ok with licence added as in rights statement) Note: no project ref as CASE studentship Duplicate record created 19-10-16 (B. Stansfield)",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1016/j.gaitpost.2016.05.012",
language = "English",
volume = "48",
pages = "209--214",
journal = "Gait and Posture",
issn = "0966-6362",
publisher = "Elsevier B.V.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Agreement of the activPAL3 and activPAL for characterising posture and stepping in adults and children

AU - Sellers, Ceri

AU - Dall, Philippa

AU - Grant, Margaret

AU - Stansfield, Ben

N1 - Acceptance date: 23-5-16 (proof in SAN) Online pub date: 1-6-16; 12m embargo required for this journal AAM: received by email 27-6-16 Funder: EPSRC (Elsevier has agreement with funders and 12m embargo is ok with licence added as in rights statement) Note: no project ref as CASE studentship Duplicate record created 19-10-16 (B. Stansfield)

PY - 2016/7

Y1 - 2016/7

N2 - Characterisation of physical activity and sedentary behaviour under free-living conditions is becoming increasingly important in light of growing evidence for the health implications of these behaviours. The integrity of long-term follow-up and the ability to compare outcomes between studies is critically dependent on the agreement of outcomes from successive generations of monitors. This study evaluated the agreement of the activPAL and second generation activPAL3 devices. Agreement was assessed in both adults (median 27.6y IQR 22.6) (n=20) and young people (median 12.0y IQR 4.1) (n=8) during standardised and daily living (ADL) test activities. During standardised activities; sedentary duration, upright duration, stepping duration and overall number of steps were all detected within small limits of agreement (=5%). However, the activPAL characterised more steps during jogging than the activPAL3 (adults +8.36%, young people +6.80%). Also during ADL differences arose due to different posture characterisation in young people and lower step detection in the activPAL than the activPAL3 (adults -20.58%, young people -11.43%). Second-by-second posture analysis demonstrated high levels (>90%) of agreement for all activities between monitors. However, sensitivity (68.7%) and positive predictive value (78.8%) for adult stepping demonstrated disagreement between monitor interpretation of movement patterns during ADL. Agreement between monitor outcomes for standardised activities provides confidence that these outcomes can be considered almost equivalent. However, for characterisation of jogging and smaller movements during ADL it is likely that significant differences between monitor outcomes will arise.

AB - Characterisation of physical activity and sedentary behaviour under free-living conditions is becoming increasingly important in light of growing evidence for the health implications of these behaviours. The integrity of long-term follow-up and the ability to compare outcomes between studies is critically dependent on the agreement of outcomes from successive generations of monitors. This study evaluated the agreement of the activPAL and second generation activPAL3 devices. Agreement was assessed in both adults (median 27.6y IQR 22.6) (n=20) and young people (median 12.0y IQR 4.1) (n=8) during standardised and daily living (ADL) test activities. During standardised activities; sedentary duration, upright duration, stepping duration and overall number of steps were all detected within small limits of agreement (=5%). However, the activPAL characterised more steps during jogging than the activPAL3 (adults +8.36%, young people +6.80%). Also during ADL differences arose due to different posture characterisation in young people and lower step detection in the activPAL than the activPAL3 (adults -20.58%, young people -11.43%). Second-by-second posture analysis demonstrated high levels (>90%) of agreement for all activities between monitors. However, sensitivity (68.7%) and positive predictive value (78.8%) for adult stepping demonstrated disagreement between monitor interpretation of movement patterns during ADL. Agreement between monitor outcomes for standardised activities provides confidence that these outcomes can be considered almost equivalent. However, for characterisation of jogging and smaller movements during ADL it is likely that significant differences between monitor outcomes will arise.

KW - activPAL3; activPAL; posture and stepping

U2 - 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2016.05.012

DO - 10.1016/j.gaitpost.2016.05.012

M3 - Article

VL - 48

SP - 209

EP - 214

JO - Gait and Posture

JF - Gait and Posture

SN - 0966-6362

ER -