Adults with intellectual disabilities: prevalence, incidence and remission of self-injurious behaviour, and related factors

Sally-Ann Cooper, Elita Smiley, Linda Allan, Alison Jackson, Janet Finlayson, Dipali Mantry, Jillian Morrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Self-injurious behaviour (SIB) is a serious condition, with implications for the person, their family and financial costs to the state providing care. The previously reported prevalence of SIB has ranged from 1.7% to 41%, or 1.7%–23.7% in community studies. There has been little study of remission rate, and incidence has not previously been reported. SIB has been reported to be individually associated with lower ability, autism and communication impairments, but given the inter-relationships between these three factors, it is not known whether they are independently associated with SIB. This study investigates the point prevalence, incidence and remission rates of SIB among the adult population with intellectual disabilities (ID), and explores which factors are independently associated with SIB.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)200-216
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Intellectual Disability Research
Volume53
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2009

Keywords

  • intellectual disabilities
  • self-injury
  • challenging behaviour

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