Access, delivery and perceived efficacy of physiotherapy and use of complementary and alternative therapies by people with progressive multiple sclerosis in the United Kingdom: an online survey

Evan Campbell, Elaine Coulter, Paul Mattison, Angus McFadyen, Linda Miller, Lorna Paul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Introduction
All people with progressive MS in the United Kingdom should have access to physiotherapy through the National Health Service (NHS). However levels of access and delivery are unknown. Furthermore there is no research on perceived efficacy of physiotherapy or the use of complementary and alternative medicine in people with progressive MS in the United Kingdom.
Methods
An online survey was carried out via the UK MS Register. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of progressive MS, a member of UK MS Register and 18 years or older. The survey asked participants regarding access and delivery of physiotherapy; perceived efficacy of physiotherapy and interventions received; barriers to accessing physiotherapy and use of complementary and alternative medicine. The following additional data were supplied from the UK MS Register: demographics, EQ5D, MSIS-29 physical and psychological sub-scales and geographical data.
Results
Total number of respondents was 1,298 from an identified 2,538 potential registrants: 87% could access physiotherapy services, 77% received physiotherapy from the NHS and 32% were currently receiving physiotherapy. The most common interventions received were home exercise programme (86%), exercises with a physiotherapist (74%) and advice/education (67%). 40% had recently used complementary and alternative medicine.
Perceived efficacy of physiotherapy was high with 70% reporting it to be either ‘beneficial’ or ‘very beneficial’. Main barriers to accessing physiotherapy were mobility, fatigue, continence, transport issues, requiring someone to go with them and pain.
Discussion
Access to physiotherapy was high with most people reporting it as beneficial. However 13% reported not having access indicating a gap in accessibility. Considering some of the barriers reported may allow physiotherapy services to address this gap in accessibility.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)64-69
Number of pages6
JournalMultiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders
Volume12
Early online date16 Jan 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2017

Fingerprint

Complementary Therapies
Multiple Sclerosis
National Health Programs
Exercise
Physical Therapists
Fatigue
Surveys and Questionnaires
United Kingdom
Demography
Psychology
Education
Pain
Research

Keywords

  • multiple sclerosis
  • physiotherapy
  • survey methodology
  • alternative medicines

Cite this

@article{c966c0f6f4df45cc8dce7caed6428067,
title = "Access, delivery and perceived efficacy of physiotherapy and use of complementary and alternative therapies by people with progressive multiple sclerosis in the United Kingdom: an online survey",
abstract = "IntroductionAll people with progressive MS in the United Kingdom should have access to physiotherapy through the National Health Service (NHS). However levels of access and delivery are unknown. Furthermore there is no research on perceived efficacy of physiotherapy or the use of complementary and alternative medicine in people with progressive MS in the United Kingdom.MethodsAn online survey was carried out via the UK MS Register. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of progressive MS, a member of UK MS Register and 18 years or older. The survey asked participants regarding access and delivery of physiotherapy; perceived efficacy of physiotherapy and interventions received; barriers to accessing physiotherapy and use of complementary and alternative medicine. The following additional data were supplied from the UK MS Register: demographics, EQ5D, MSIS-29 physical and psychological sub-scales and geographical data.ResultsTotal number of respondents was 1,298 from an identified 2,538 potential registrants: 87{\%} could access physiotherapy services, 77{\%} received physiotherapy from the NHS and 32{\%} were currently receiving physiotherapy. The most common interventions received were home exercise programme (86{\%}), exercises with a physiotherapist (74{\%}) and advice/education (67{\%}). 40{\%} had recently used complementary and alternative medicine.Perceived efficacy of physiotherapy was high with 70{\%} reporting it to be either ‘beneficial’ or ‘very beneficial’. Main barriers to accessing physiotherapy were mobility, fatigue, continence, transport issues, requiring someone to go with them and pain.DiscussionAccess to physiotherapy was high with most people reporting it as beneficial. However 13{\%} reported not having access indicating a gap in accessibility. Considering some of the barriers reported may allow physiotherapy services to address this gap in accessibility.",
keywords = "multiple sclerosis, physiotherapy, survey methodology, alternative medicines",
author = "Evan Campbell and Elaine Coulter and Paul Mattison and Angus McFadyen and Linda Miller and Lorna Paul",
note = "Acceptance date from journal webpage (screenshot saved) AAM provided 3-4-17; 12m embargo",
year = "2017",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.msard.2017.01.002",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "64--69",
journal = "Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders",
issn = "2211-0348",
publisher = "Elsevier B.V.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Access, delivery and perceived efficacy of physiotherapy and use of complementary and alternative therapies by people with progressive multiple sclerosis in the United Kingdom: an online survey

AU - Campbell, Evan

AU - Coulter, Elaine

AU - Mattison, Paul

AU - McFadyen, Angus

AU - Miller, Linda

AU - Paul, Lorna

N1 - Acceptance date from journal webpage (screenshot saved) AAM provided 3-4-17; 12m embargo

PY - 2017/2

Y1 - 2017/2

N2 - IntroductionAll people with progressive MS in the United Kingdom should have access to physiotherapy through the National Health Service (NHS). However levels of access and delivery are unknown. Furthermore there is no research on perceived efficacy of physiotherapy or the use of complementary and alternative medicine in people with progressive MS in the United Kingdom.MethodsAn online survey was carried out via the UK MS Register. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of progressive MS, a member of UK MS Register and 18 years or older. The survey asked participants regarding access and delivery of physiotherapy; perceived efficacy of physiotherapy and interventions received; barriers to accessing physiotherapy and use of complementary and alternative medicine. The following additional data were supplied from the UK MS Register: demographics, EQ5D, MSIS-29 physical and psychological sub-scales and geographical data.ResultsTotal number of respondents was 1,298 from an identified 2,538 potential registrants: 87% could access physiotherapy services, 77% received physiotherapy from the NHS and 32% were currently receiving physiotherapy. The most common interventions received were home exercise programme (86%), exercises with a physiotherapist (74%) and advice/education (67%). 40% had recently used complementary and alternative medicine.Perceived efficacy of physiotherapy was high with 70% reporting it to be either ‘beneficial’ or ‘very beneficial’. Main barriers to accessing physiotherapy were mobility, fatigue, continence, transport issues, requiring someone to go with them and pain.DiscussionAccess to physiotherapy was high with most people reporting it as beneficial. However 13% reported not having access indicating a gap in accessibility. Considering some of the barriers reported may allow physiotherapy services to address this gap in accessibility.

AB - IntroductionAll people with progressive MS in the United Kingdom should have access to physiotherapy through the National Health Service (NHS). However levels of access and delivery are unknown. Furthermore there is no research on perceived efficacy of physiotherapy or the use of complementary and alternative medicine in people with progressive MS in the United Kingdom.MethodsAn online survey was carried out via the UK MS Register. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of progressive MS, a member of UK MS Register and 18 years or older. The survey asked participants regarding access and delivery of physiotherapy; perceived efficacy of physiotherapy and interventions received; barriers to accessing physiotherapy and use of complementary and alternative medicine. The following additional data were supplied from the UK MS Register: demographics, EQ5D, MSIS-29 physical and psychological sub-scales and geographical data.ResultsTotal number of respondents was 1,298 from an identified 2,538 potential registrants: 87% could access physiotherapy services, 77% received physiotherapy from the NHS and 32% were currently receiving physiotherapy. The most common interventions received were home exercise programme (86%), exercises with a physiotherapist (74%) and advice/education (67%). 40% had recently used complementary and alternative medicine.Perceived efficacy of physiotherapy was high with 70% reporting it to be either ‘beneficial’ or ‘very beneficial’. Main barriers to accessing physiotherapy were mobility, fatigue, continence, transport issues, requiring someone to go with them and pain.DiscussionAccess to physiotherapy was high with most people reporting it as beneficial. However 13% reported not having access indicating a gap in accessibility. Considering some of the barriers reported may allow physiotherapy services to address this gap in accessibility.

KW - multiple sclerosis

KW - physiotherapy

KW - survey methodology

KW - alternative medicines

U2 - 10.1016/j.msard.2017.01.002

DO - 10.1016/j.msard.2017.01.002

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 64

EP - 69

JO - Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders

JF - Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders

SN - 2211-0348

ER -