Acceptability of HIV self-sampling kits (TINY vial) among people of black African ethnicity in the UK: a qualitative study

C. Dodds, E. Mugweni, G. Phillips, C. Park, I. Young, F. Fakoya, S. Wayal, L. McDaid, M. Sachikonye, J. Chwaula, P. Flowers, F. Burns

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: Increasing routine HIV testing among key populations is a public health imperative, so improving access to acceptable testing options for those in need is a priority. Despite increasing targeted distribution and uptake of HIV self-sampling kits (SSKs) among men who have sex with men in the UK, little is known about why targeted SSK interventions for black African users are not as wide-spread or well-used. This paper addresses this key gap, offering insight into why some groups may be less likely than others to adopt certain types of SSK interventions in particular contexts. These data were collected during the development phase of a larger study to explore the feasibility and acceptability of targeted distribution of SSKs to black African people.
Original languageEnglish
Article number499
Number of pages24
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Apr 2018

Fingerprint

HIV
Public Health
Population

Keywords

  • HIV testing
  • African ethnicity

Cite this

Dodds, C. ; Mugweni, E. ; Phillips, G. ; Park, C. ; Young, I. ; Fakoya, F. ; Wayal, S. ; McDaid, L. ; Sachikonye, M. ; Chwaula, J. ; Flowers, P. ; Burns, F. / Acceptability of HIV self-sampling kits (TINY vial) among people of black African ethnicity in the UK: a qualitative study. In: BMC Public Health. 2018 ; Vol. 18.
@article{e4146bc1cbba4b0dad7296edf49ca4d6,
title = "Acceptability of HIV self-sampling kits (TINY vial) among people of black African ethnicity in the UK: a qualitative study",
abstract = "Background: Increasing routine HIV testing among key populations is a public health imperative, so improving access to acceptable testing options for those in need is a priority. Despite increasing targeted distribution and uptake of HIV self-sampling kits (SSKs) among men who have sex with men in the UK, little is known about why targeted SSK interventions for black African users are not as wide-spread or well-used. This paper addresses this key gap, offering insight into why some groups may be less likely than others to adopt certain types of SSK interventions in particular contexts. These data were collected during the development phase of a larger study to explore the feasibility and acceptability of targeted distribution of SSKs to black African people.",
keywords = "HIV testing, African ethnicity",
author = "C. Dodds and E. Mugweni and G. Phillips and C. Park and I. Young and F. Fakoya and S. Wayal and L. McDaid and M. Sachikonye and J. Chwaula and P. Flowers and F. Burns",
note = "Acceptance from webpage OA article Funding: This project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment (NIHR HTA) Programme (project number 12/138/02).",
year = "2018",
month = "4",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1186/s12889-018-5256-5",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
journal = "BMC Public Health",
issn = "1471-2458",
publisher = "BioMed Central Ltd.",

}

Dodds, C, Mugweni, E, Phillips, G, Park, C, Young, I, Fakoya, F, Wayal, S, McDaid, L, Sachikonye, M, Chwaula, J, Flowers, P & Burns, F 2018, 'Acceptability of HIV self-sampling kits (TINY vial) among people of black African ethnicity in the UK: a qualitative study', BMC Public Health, vol. 18, 499. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-5256-5

Acceptability of HIV self-sampling kits (TINY vial) among people of black African ethnicity in the UK: a qualitative study. / Dodds, C.; Mugweni, E.; Phillips, G.; Park, C.; Young, I.; Fakoya, F.; Wayal, S.; McDaid, L.; Sachikonye, M.; Chwaula, J.; Flowers, P.; Burns, F.

In: BMC Public Health, Vol. 18, 499, 13.04.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acceptability of HIV self-sampling kits (TINY vial) among people of black African ethnicity in the UK: a qualitative study

AU - Dodds, C.

AU - Mugweni, E.

AU - Phillips, G.

AU - Park, C.

AU - Young, I.

AU - Fakoya, F.

AU - Wayal, S.

AU - McDaid, L.

AU - Sachikonye, M.

AU - Chwaula, J.

AU - Flowers, P.

AU - Burns, F.

N1 - Acceptance from webpage OA article Funding: This project was funded by the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment (NIHR HTA) Programme (project number 12/138/02).

PY - 2018/4/13

Y1 - 2018/4/13

N2 - Background: Increasing routine HIV testing among key populations is a public health imperative, so improving access to acceptable testing options for those in need is a priority. Despite increasing targeted distribution and uptake of HIV self-sampling kits (SSKs) among men who have sex with men in the UK, little is known about why targeted SSK interventions for black African users are not as wide-spread or well-used. This paper addresses this key gap, offering insight into why some groups may be less likely than others to adopt certain types of SSK interventions in particular contexts. These data were collected during the development phase of a larger study to explore the feasibility and acceptability of targeted distribution of SSKs to black African people.

AB - Background: Increasing routine HIV testing among key populations is a public health imperative, so improving access to acceptable testing options for those in need is a priority. Despite increasing targeted distribution and uptake of HIV self-sampling kits (SSKs) among men who have sex with men in the UK, little is known about why targeted SSK interventions for black African users are not as wide-spread or well-used. This paper addresses this key gap, offering insight into why some groups may be less likely than others to adopt certain types of SSK interventions in particular contexts. These data were collected during the development phase of a larger study to explore the feasibility and acceptability of targeted distribution of SSKs to black African people.

KW - HIV testing

KW - African ethnicity

U2 - 10.1186/s12889-018-5256-5

DO - 10.1186/s12889-018-5256-5

M3 - Article

VL - 18

JO - BMC Public Health

JF - BMC Public Health

SN - 1471-2458

M1 - 499

ER -