A rapid review of sexual wellbeing definitions and measures: should we now include sexual wellbeing freedom?

Karen Lorimer, Leyla DeAmicis, Jenny Dalrymple, Jamie Frankis, Louise J. Jackson, Paula Lorgelly, Lesley McMillan, Jonathan Ross

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Abstract

An increasing number of studies refer to sexual wellbeing and/or seek to measure it, and the term appears across various policy documents, including sexual health frameworks in the UK. We conducted a rapid review to determine how sexual wellbeing has been defined, qualitatively explored and quantitatively measured. Eligible studies selected for inclusion from OVID Medline, PsychInfo, PubMed, Embase, CINAHL were: in English language, published after 2007, were peer-reviewed full articles, focused on sexual wellbeing (or proxies for, e.g. satisfaction, function), and quantitatively or qualitatively assessed sexual wellbeing. We included studies with participants aged 16-65. Given study heterogeneity, our synthesis and findings are reported using a narrative approach. We identified 162 papers, of which 10 offered a definition of sexual wellbeing. Drawing upon a socio-ecological model, we categorised the 59 dimensions we identified from studies under three main domains: cognitive-affect (31 dimensions); inter-personal (22 dimensions); and socio-cultural (6 dimensions). Only 11 papers were categorised under the socio-cultural domain, commonly focusing on gender inequalities or stigma. We discuss the importance of conceptualising sexual wellbeing as individually experienced but socially and structurally influenced, including assessing sexual wellbeing freedom: a person’s freedom to achieve sexual wellbeing, or their real opportunities and liberties.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)843-853
JournalJournal of Sex Research
Volume56
Issue number7
Early online date23 Jul 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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Keywords

  • review
  • sexual wellbeing
  • sexual violence
  • sociological theory

Cite this

Lorimer, Karen ; DeAmicis, Leyla ; Dalrymple, Jenny ; Frankis, Jamie ; Jackson, Louise J. ; Lorgelly, Paula ; McMillan, Lesley ; Ross, Jonathan. / A rapid review of sexual wellbeing definitions and measures: should we now include sexual wellbeing freedom?. In: Journal of Sex Research. 2019 ; Vol. 56, No. 7. pp. 843-853.
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A rapid review of sexual wellbeing definitions and measures: should we now include sexual wellbeing freedom? / Lorimer, Karen; DeAmicis, Leyla; Dalrymple, Jenny; Frankis, Jamie; Jackson, Louise J. ; Lorgelly, Paula; McMillan, Lesley; Ross, Jonathan.

In: Journal of Sex Research, Vol. 56, No. 7, 2019, p. 843-853.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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