A population-based record linkage study of mortality in hepatitis C-diagnosed persons with or without HIV coinfection in Scotland

S.A. McDonald, M. Donaghy, D.J. Goldberg, S.J. Hutchinson, C. Robertson, S.M. Bird, P.R. Mills, J. Dillon, M. Bloor, P. Hayes, L. Graham, Chief Scientist Office (Funder), Medical Research Council (Funder)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is known to increase the risk of death from severe liver disease and, because HCV status is strongly associated with a history of injecting drug use, the effect of a key disease progression cofactor, infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), is of interest. We examined all-cause, liver-related and drug-related mortality and excess risk of death from these causes in a large cohort of HCV-monoinfected and HIV-coinfected persons in Scotland. The study population consisted of 20,163 persons confirmed to be infected with hepatitis C through laboratory testing in Scotland between 1991 and 2005. Records with sufficient identifiers were linked to the General Register Office for Scotland death register to retrieve associated mortality data, and were further linked to a national database of HIV-positive individuals to determine coinfection status.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)271-283
Number of pages13
JournalStatistical Methods in Medical Research
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2009

Keywords

  • record linkage study
  • hepatitis C
  • injecting drug use

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    McDonald, S. A., Donaghy, M., Goldberg, D. J., Hutchinson, S. J., Robertson, C., Bird, S. M., Mills, P. R., Dillon, J., Bloor, M., Hayes, P., Graham, L., (Funder), C. S. O., & (Funder), M. R. C. (2009). A population-based record linkage study of mortality in hepatitis C-diagnosed persons with or without HIV coinfection in Scotland. Statistical Methods in Medical Research, 18(3), 271-283. https://doi.org/10.1177/0962280208094690